RMC Health Offers Resources for Helping Children Cope with Violence, Tragedy, Disaster

Posted on July 26, 2012

0


As feelings of shock give way to deep sadness and impossible questions in the days following the horrific attack on moviegoers in Aurora, Colorado, we have reached out to our friends at RMC Health in the Denver area to offer some sound advice for helping people, especially children, cope in the wake of disaster.

“Aurora is part of a large metro area, but it’s a small world.” says Sharon Murray, RMC Health president. “Even when you see strangers in your own community, you know they could be going through something terrible.”

But how do you even broach the subject with someone who has lost a loved one in such a senseless act of violence? Ms. Murray’s advice is to not be afraid to talk about what happened.

“You don’t want to keep bringing it up, but you can let the person know you are there for them,” she says.

Survivors of the Columbine shooting, many of whom are now approaching their thirties, are reaching out to the victims’ families. Their message: “You won’t get over it, but you will get better.”

The faith community has held vigils all over Denver metro area, and across the region, flags are being flown at half mast to show unity and support for the people of Aurora. Many mental health services have been made available and anyone, even those not directly affected, can access helplines, e-mail support, and face-to-face counseling services.

With school starting in just a few weeks in some parts of the country, parents, teachers, and students may be feeling anxious about going back. RMC Health has compiled the following resources that can help adults respond to questions, guide conversations, and recognize signs of anxiety in response to trauma.

Good coverage from reputable news agencies:

To help your school prepare for disaster, please see School Crisis Guide, NEA-HIN.

To directly help the victims of the Aurora tragedy and their families, please visit givingfirst.org.

Advertisements